WOKE-UP with this name of “EDWIN MANNING” – I had to check it out – EDWIN MANNING [LIBRARY of CONGRESS] DISTRICT of COLUMBIA ?

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Edwin Manning

MANNING, GURLEY, BARROWS, SAMPLE, BRYANT

Posted By: Fran Hunt, Volunteer
Date: 10/6/2001 at 09:15:08

From the Portrait and Biographical Album of Jefferson and Van Buren Counties – 1890
EDWIN MANNING
Edwin Manning, the honored pioneer, has for half a century made his home on the site of Keosauqua, Van Buren County, of which city he was the founder. This volume would be incomplete without his sketch for he has not only been long a resident of the county, but has been identified with its growth and progress and few have aided more in the advancement of its interests.
Mr. Manning was born in Coventry Connecticut February 8, 1810, and is a son of Calvin and Desire Gurley Manning who belonged to old New England families. They were parents of two sons and two daughters. Fannie the eldest, married James Preston and died in her native county; Edwin is the second in order of birth; William died on the old homestead at the age of thirty years, and Anna R., wife of Dr. S.W. Barrows is living in Hartford Connecticut. The parents, who were consistent and faithful members of the Congregational Church, died in Coventry, Connecticut, respected by all who knew them. Mr. Manning was a Whig in political sentiment and was honored by an election to the office of Commissioner of Des Moines River Improvement and also served in said office until its affairs were finally adjusted.
The subject of this sketch was reared in a manner similar to the majority of boys of his day and received his education in the primitive schools of his native state. When a lad of sixteen years he entered the store of his uncle Royal Manning, as salesman, which position he held for six months, when he went to Bethany Pennsylvania, where he accepted a similar position with another uncle James, Manning, receiving $10 per month as a compensation for his services. After five years, in which time he had mastered the business, he was taken in as a partner with a third interest. Aside from the knowledge gained concerning mercantile life, Mr. Manning acquired other information, which proved of much value to him in after life. His uncle during his stay in Bethany, was elected Associate Justice and Recorder of the county, and Edwin became acquainted with the routine of those offices which knowledge proved of great benefit to him in after life in making plats, etc. In 1831, he left Bethany and embarked in business at Canton Corners, Bradford County Pennsylvania, forming a partnership with J.C. Rose under the firm name of Manning and Rose, which connection was continued until the autumn of 1836, when he disposed of his interest and started for the West. He boarded a boat for St. Louis, then the metropolis of the West, and on reaching his destination Col. Benton advised him and his associates to locate in that city, but thinking his purse too light to invest much in real estate there, he pushed on to Lexington Missouri, where he made inquires in regard to lands. On receiving information that he could obtain property in Saline and Jackson Counties, accompanied by his uncle and a Mr. Tyler he made his way to the places indicated and became owner of some real estate, of which Mr. Tyler was left in charge. Being opposed to slavery, he and his uncle proceeded northward up the Mississippi and Des Moines Rivers to St. Francisville, Lee County. That was in December of 1836. After making some investments they continued on to Ft Madison, where they visited the wigwam of the noted chief Black Hawk, who treated them in a friendly manner but appeared rather reticent in regard to giving information seeming to realize that his power was fast being taken from him.
In January of 1837, Mr. Manning with James Hall, John Fuirman and John Carnes, purchased a claim to the land and platted the town of Keosauqua. Our subject then returned on a visit to Pennsylvania, but the following year again came to Iowa and attended the first land sale at Burlington, purchasing several small tracts of land for himself together with quite a large amount for others. In 1839, he purchased in New York the first stock of goods ever brought to Keosauqua, shipping the same by way of the sea to the mouth of the Mississippi and up that river to Churchville, the mouth of the Des Moines River, being seven weeks on their way. He also built the first flatboat, in 1844 that floated down the Des Moines River, and ran the first loaded steamer from St Louis to Des Moines in 1851. He was appointed Commissioner of the Des Moines River Improvement, by Gov. Grimes; serving in that capacity in 1859. In fact there are few industries or enterprises or works of improvement and progress of the early days with which he was not connected.
Mr. Manning has been twice married. In Lee County Iowa March 8 1842, he was joined in wedlock with Miss Sarah J. Sample, who was born in Pennsylvania, July 21, 1816 and died June 1, 1857, leaving three children—Calvin a prominent attorney of Ottumwa Iowa; William who is engaged in farming and Anna G. The second marriage of Edwin Manning was solemnized November 3, 1859, the lady of his choice being Nannie Bryant, who was born in Indiana, February 3, 1832, and is an adopted daughter of Hon. Joseph A. Wright. Unto them have been born five children: Albert, Edward Bates, Stanley, Craig and Katie W. Mrs. Manning and Katie are members of the Congregational Church, and are among its most active and faithful workers. Out of the kindness of her heart Mrs. Manning performs many acts of charity and deeds of love which have won for her the lasting gratitude and affection of those who were recipients of her bounty and the respect of all who were witnesses of her kindness. However her work is all performed in a quiet and unostentatious manner, that it may not be praised by men.
In early life, Mr. Manning was a Whig and cast his first vote for Gen. Harrison. Since the organization of the Republican Party he has been one of its stalwart supporters, yet notwithstanding his prominence in the county and State he has steadily refused to accept public office, devoting his attention exclusively to his business interests and the discharge of his duties as a private citizen. Words of praise and high regard are spoken on every hand of Mr. Manning who, it would seem is without an enemy. Stories are told of his generosity, of numberless good deeds quietly performed, of words of encouragement offered to the despondent and of substantial aid given to those in need. In his earlier years his own life was a struggle to gain a firm financial standing and he therefore readily feels sympathy for others. His capital when he started out in life for himself consisted of a good constitution, temperate and frugal habits, pluck and perseverance and unquestioned integrity, but he has in the years which have come and gone acquired an ample competence and worked his way upward to a prominent position and is respected by all men.
As an illustration of the changes, that has taken place during the half century, which Mr. Manning has spent in Van Buren County, he cites the fact that he has lived in the territories of Michigan and Wisconsin, and the Territory and State of Iowa all under one roof. On his arrival there were only about one-fourth as many inhabitants in the whole Territory as we now find in the county. Few improvements had been made, the land was in its primitive condition and the future of the State was unknown. Even the most far-sighted could not have dreamed of its brightness and we would certainly claim it an honor to have been an eye witness of the wonderful transformation, but to be an active participant in the various changes which have taken place is a favor not shown to every one, yet among the latter class is enrolled Edwin Manning, the pioneer of Van Buren County, and the builder of the first brick courthouse in the State of Iowa in 1842, which is now as good as new.
I am not related, and am only copying this for the information of those who might find this person in their family.

 

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Edwin C. Manning House (Florida House) 200 East Capitol Street, N.E. Washington District of Columbia
HABS No. DC-330
i Cs
PHOTOGRAPHS
WRITTEN HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE DATA
Historic American Buildings Survey National Park Service Department of the Interior Washington, D.C. 20240
DC
HISTORIC AMERICAN BUILDINGS SURVEY
EDWIN C. MANNING HOUSE HABS No. DC-330
Location:
Present Owner:
Present Use:
Significance:
200 East Capitol Street, northeast corner of East Capitol and Second Streets, N.E., District of Columbia. The address was also given as 1 Second Street, N.E.
Florida House, Washington, D.C., Inc.
At the time of this recording, the house is vacant. The Florida State Society plans to restore the house for use as headquarters.
With its patterned brick, projecting bays, raised basement, and stained-glass transoms, this house is typical of the brick row houses that were being built extensively on Capitol Hillthe residential area east of the U.S. Capitol—in the late 19th century. Its corner location and large window openings make it a particularly interesting example of its type.
PART I.  HISTORICAL INFORMATION
A.  Physical History:
1. Date of erection: The building permit for the house was issued on September 24, 1891. (See field records for copy of the original).
2. Builder or contractor: No architect’s name is listed on the building permit. The builder was C. C. Meads.
3. Original and subsequent owners: Legal description of property on which building stands: Lot 38 in Manning’s subdivision of original Lot 6 in Square 759 as recorded in Plat Record Book 20, page 67.
The following is an incomplete chain of title to the property on which the building stands:
1890 Deed October 27, 1890, recorded February 11, 1891 in Liber 1561, folio 145. Aaron H. and Harriet S, Byington of Norwalk, Connecticut To Edwin C. Manning For a consideration of $15,000. Property conveyed included all of original Lot 6.
1893 Because of legal complications, a deed virtually identical to the one above was recorded on February 23, 1893, Liber 1779 folio 167.
EDWIN C. MANNING HOUSE IIABS No. DC-330 (Page 2)
1894 Deed recorded July 18, 1894 in Liber 1929, folio 388. Edwin C. Manning et ux To Benjamin 0. Honors et ux of Swampscott, Massachusetts For subplots 37r 38, and 39 of original Lot 6. Lot 38 subject to deed of trust to secure loan of $5,000.
1899 Deed September 14, 1899. Benjamin Honors To William H. Michael
1902 Deed of Trust May 2, 1902 William H. Michael To Richard Tyler
1905 Release, dated August 29, 1905, recorded in Liber 2941, folio 89. Henry H. Bergmann, et al. (Secretary of the American Fire Assurance Company) To Georgia Drum
1907 Deed of Trust dated June 5, 1907, recorded in Liber 3083, folio 153. William H. Michael et ux To Richard Pairo et al. (lawyers)
1908 Deed of Trust dated April 15, 1908, recorded in Liber 3143, folio 199. Alexander Wolfe, et al., (lawyer)
1908 Release dated June 9, 1908, recorded in Liber 3167, folio 56. Alexander Wolfe et al. (trustees) To William H. Michael
1908 Deed of Trust dated June 15, 1908, recorded in Liber 3147, folio 153. William H. Michael To Richard E. Pairo et al. (lawyer)
1908 Release dated June 15, 1908, recorded in Liber 3147, folio 162. Richard E. Pairo To William H. Michael
EDWIN C. MANNING HOUSE HABS No. DC-330 (Page 3)
1909 Deed of Trust, dated July 2, 1909, recorded in Liber 3256, folio 7. William H. Michael To Charles C. Waters
1909 Release dated July 2, 1909, recorded in Liber 3257, folio 43. Richard E. Pairo, et al. To William H. Michael
1916 Deed of Trust, dated October 19, 1916, recorded in Liber 3923, folio 313. William H. Michael et ux To Benjamin & Emmerich (trustees, German-American Fire Assurance Co.)
1917 Deed of Trust, dated March 7, 1917, recorded in Liber 3950, folio 375. William H. Michael et ux To Kincheloe & Cain (trustees)
1935 Deed dated October 7, 1935, recorded in Liber 6930, folio 479. Myron M. Michael et ux To Nannie E. Michael (wife of William H. Michael)
1939 Deed date March 31, 1939, recorded in Liber 7331, folio 206, Nannie E. Michael To Robert Reynolds
Th exact chain of title in the early 20th century is not yet clear.
1943 Deed January 18, 1843 in Liber 7826, folio 259. American Security and Trust To Robert R. Reynolds, et ux
1950 Deed November 27, 1950, in Liber 9352, folio 464. Robert R. Reynolds To Frances Reynolds Oertling
Ha
EDWIN C. MANNING HOUSE HABS No. DC-330 (Page 4)
1972 Deed March 2, 1972, in Liber 13320, folio 064. Frances Reynolds Oertling et vir To Lucia Gomez, at al. (tenants in Common)
1972 Deed April 18, 1972, in Liber 13336, folio 365. Lucia Gomez, et al. To Florida House, Washington, D.C., Inc.
4. Original plan and construction: The building permit gives the following information about the original plans of the house. The house was built on solid land, and was 18′-6″ wide and 47* long. It was two stories in height with a basement and stood 30′ from the sidewalk to the highest point of the roof. The foundation and walls were of brick and were 13″ thick in the basement and 13M and 9″ at the first and second floors. The party wall was 13″ thick in the basement and 9″ at the first and second floors. The roof was flat, with a tin covering and was reached by a scuttle. The three bay windows were a full 30′ in height, 12′ wide, and projected 5′ from the main walls. Since the bay windows and the steps were to project beyond the building line, a special permit had to be obtained. A plan showing the exterior dimensions of the house is on file with the application for this permit. The estimated total cost of the house was $5,300.
5. Alterations and additions: In 1894, Edwin Manning obtained a permit to add a 4′ x 13′ tin-roofed frame bathroom to the rear of the house. (See field records for copy of original building permit)
On May 15, 1902, William Michael received permission to replace a brick area wall. (See field records for a copy of the original building permit)
About 1924 the house was apparently divided into apartments. The Washington Directory for that year indicated that there were seven people living at the address; however, subsequent listings usually show four or five apartments. The house apparently again became a single-family dwelling from 1948 through 1956, but the 1962 directory listing shows five apartments.
B.  Historical Persons and Events Associated with the Structure:
Polk’s Directories for Washington, D.C. give the following tenant information:
1895 through 1896 Edwin C. Manning, variously listed as Civil engineer, contractor, and inspector. In 1895 and 1896, his brother, Ernest F. also resided at the same address.
EDWIN C. MANNING HOUSE HABS No. DC-330 (Page 5)
1899 through 1934 William H. Michaels, variously a grocer, feed store owner, salesman, and real estate dealer.
1839 Edward Tadlock and wife, Clerk Arthur Cotner (Martha), Laborer, Navy Yard Harry F. Calloway (Jewell) Henry Mills (Mary) James A. George, Carpenter, Library of Congress
1940 Maxwell D. Niel (Blanche), Laborer, U.S. Capitol Campfire Girls, Inc., “Kawadici-Wohelo” District of Columbia Office
1941 Maxwell D. Niel Robert R. Reynolds, Jr. (Mary M.), Special Attorney, Department of Justice, Apartment 1 Anne B. Mitchell, with Government Accounting Office, Apartment 5 James A. George, Stationary Engineer, Library of Congress, Apartment 4
1942 Mrs. Lucy K. Delay, Clerk, Census Bureau, Apartment 2 Grothann H. Oertling, Statistician, Apartment 6 Goldie Pace, Clerk, Treasury Department, Apartment 4 Robert R. Reynolds, Jr., Apartment 1
1943 The listing for this year is somewhat confusing. Robert R. Reynolds, Jr., is listed as the householder, but there appear to be no tenants.
1948 John R. McDowell (Virginia C), Member of Congress
1954 and 1956 John C. Wallace, Jr. (Mary E.), Supervisor, Capitol Transit Company
1962 Charles W. Williford, Clerk, FBI, Apartment 1 Robert W. Butler, Carpenter, Apartment 2 Apartments 3 and 4, vacant Mrs. Augusta Tremont, Nurse, Apartment 5
1964 through 1969 Windred E. Dobyns (Mary V.), REA Express Mrs. Dobyns kept furnished rooms.
1972 The house is presently vacant and has been for several years.
The above listing illustrates the rather fluctuating history of the Manning house. It began as a one-family dwelling, added a basement store, and was later divided into apartments. It apparently regained its status as a single-family dwelling for a short time, again became apartments and finally was a rooming house at the time it was vacated.
EDWIN C. MANNING HOUSE EIABS No. DC-330 (Page 6}
The house was purchased in 1939 by Robert Rice Reynolds, (1884-1963) U.S. Senator from North Carolina. Although Reynolds himself apparently never lived in the hosue, his son Robert R. Reynolds, Jr., is listed in the Washington Directory as resident in the house in 1941-42 and his son-in-law, Grothann Oertling, in 1942.
Reynolds, a Democrat, was first elected to the Senate in 1932 to fill an unexpired term and continued to serve for two more full terms. As an isolationist prior to 1941, he counseled against American involvement in European War. He favored a very restrictive immigration policy and introduced numerous bills to provide for the registration and fingerprinting of aliens, with others who shared his chauvinistic views, he founded the American Nationalist Party in 1938. He served as editor of the American Vindicator, the party newspaper, which he published at 1 Second Street, NE from April 1940 until December 1942. Ironically, Reynolds served as Chairman of the Military Affairs Committee of the Senate from 1941-44. In 1945 he retired from politics to practice law in Washington, D.C.
In 1948, the house was leased by John R. McDowell, (1902-1957) a member of the House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. McDowell became the president of the Wilkinsburg (Pa.) Gazette Publishing Company before being elected as a Republican to the 76th Congress in 1939-41. He was elected again to the 80th Congress, serving from 1947-1949. During at least part of this latter term, he resided in this house. After being defeated for reelection, McDowell returned to his publishing business in Wilkinsburg.
C.  Sources of Information:
1. Original and unpublished sources:
District of Columbia Deed Books, Recorder of Deeds, 6th and D Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C.
District of Columbia Office of Licenses and Permits, Room LL-11 614 H Street, N.W., Washington, D.C.
2. Published sources:
The American Vindicator (Washington, D.C), April 1940, through December 1942. (Copies available in the Library of Congress.)
Polk’s Washington Directory (189 through 1969) (Copies in the Washingtonian Room, Central Library, District of Columbia Public Library.)
“Robert Rice Reynolds.” National Cyclopedia of American Biography, Vol. 50. New York: James T. White & Co., 1968.
EDWIN C. MANNING HOUSE HABS No. DC-330 (Page 7)
“Robert Rice Reynolds.” Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1961. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1961.
D.  Project Information:
This information was researched by Ursula Theobald, and collated and edited for transmittal to the Library of Congress by Eleni Silverman Historian, HABS in May of 1934. 

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Edwin C. Manning House, 200 East Capitol Street Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC Florida House

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About this Item

Title
Edwin C. Manning House, 200 East Capitol Street Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC
Other Title
Florida House
Contributor Names
Historic American Buildings Survey, creator
Created / Published
Documentation compiled after 1933
Subject Headings
–  houses
–  District Of Columbia — District Of Columbia — Washington
Notes
–  Significance: With its patterned brick, projecting bays, raised basement, and stained-glass transoms, this house is typical of the brick row houses that were being built extensively on Capitol Hill the residential area east of the U.S. Capitol in the late 19th century. Its corner location and large window openings make it a particularly interesting example of its type.
–  Unprocessed Field note material exists for this structure: FN-62
–  Survey number: HABS DC-330
Medium
Photo(s): 2
Data Page(s): 8
Photo Caption Page(s): 1
Call Number/Physical Location
HABS DC,WASH,483-
Source Collection
Historic American Buildings Survey (Library of Congress)
Repository
Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print
Digital Id
hhh linkdc0381-data 1 //www.loc.gov:8081/pictures/search/?q=Photograph: dc0381&fi=number&op=PHRASE&va=exact&co =hh&st=gallery&sg = true
hhh dc0381data //cdn.loc.gov/master/pnp/habshaer/dc/dc0300/dc0381/data/dc0381data.pdf
hhh dc0381cap //cdn.loc.gov/master/pnp/habshaer/dc/dc0300/dc0381/data/dc0381cap.pdf
Control Number
dc0381
Rights Advisory
No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted. http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
Online Format
image
pdf

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For information about reproducing, publishing, and citing material from this collection, as well as access to the original items, see: Historic American Buildings Survey/Historic American Engineering Record/Historic American Landscape Survey (HABS/HAER/HALS) Collection – Rights and Restrictions Information

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For guidance about compiling full citations consult Citing Primary Sources.

  • Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on images made by the U.S. Government; images copied from other sources may be restricted. http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/res/114_habs.html
  • Reproduction Number: —
  • Call Number: HABS DC,WASH,483-
  • Access Advisory: —

Obtaining Copies

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HABS/HAER/HALS materials have generally been scanned at high resolution that is suitable for most publication purposes (see Digitizing the Collection for further details about the digital images).

  • Photographs–All photographs are printed from digital files to preserve the fragile originals.
    • Make note of the Call Number and Item Number that appear under the photograph in the multiple-image display (e.g., HAER, NY,52-BRIG,4-2).
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If Digital Images Are Not Displaying

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  • P&P reading room staff can provide up to 15 quick copies of items per calendar year (many original items in the holdings are too old or fragile to make such copies, but generally HABS/HAER/HALS materials are in good enough condition to be placed on photocopy machines). For assistance, see our Ask a Librarian page OR
  • Hire a freelance researcher to do further selection for you (a list of researchers in available at: http://www.loc.gov/rr/print/resource/013_pic.html).
  • You can purchase copies of various types, including quick copies, through Library of Congress Duplication Services (price lists, contact information, and order forms for Library of Congress Duplication Services are available on the Duplication Services Web site):
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    • Look at the Medium field above. If it lists more than one item:
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      • All the items in a particular medium (e.g., all drawings, all photographs) can be ordered as photocopies or high-quality copies.

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Please use the following steps to determine whether you need to fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room to view the original item(s). In some cases, a surrogate (substitute image) is available, often in the form of a digital image, a copy print, or microfilm.

  1. Is the item digitized? (A thumbnail (small) image will be visible on the left.)
    • Yes, the item is digitized. Please use the digital image in preference to requesting the original. All images can be viewed at a large size when you are in any reading room at the Library of Congress. In some cases, only thumbnail (small) images are available when you are outside the Library of Congress because the item is rights restricted or has not been evaluated for rights restrictions.
      As a preservation measure, we generally do not serve an original item when a digital image is available. If you have a compelling reason to see the original, consult with a reference librarian. (Sometimes, the original is simply too fragile to serve. For example, glass and film photographic negatives are particularly subject to damage. They are also easier to see online where they are presented as positive images.)
    • No, the item is not digitized. Please go to #2.
  2. Do the Access Advisory or Call Number fields above indicate that a non-digital surrogate exists, such as microfilm or copy prints?
    • Yes, another surrogate exists. Reference staff can direct you to this surrogate.
    • No, another surrogate does not exist. Please go to #3.
  3. If you do not see a thumbnail image or a reference to another surrogate, please fill out a call slip in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room. In many cases, the originals can be served in a few minutes. Other materials require appointments for later the same day or in the future. Reference staff can advise you in both how to fill out a call slip and when the item can be served.

To contact Reference staff in the Prints and Photographs Reading Room, please use our Ask A Librarian service or call the reading room between 8:30 and 5:00 at 202-707-6394, and Press 3.

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Cite This Item

Citations are generated automatically from bibliographic data as a convenience, and may not be complete or accurate.

Chicago citation style:

Historic American Buildings Survey, Creator. Edwin C. Manning House, 200 East Capitol Street Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC. Documentation Compiled After, 1933. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/dc0381/. (Accessed January 31, 2017.)

APA citation style:

Historic American Buildings Survey, C. (1933) Edwin C. Manning House, 200 East Capitol Street Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC. Documentation Compiled After. [Pdf] Retrieved from the Library of Congress, https://www.loc.gov/item/dc0381/.

MLA citation style:

Historic American Buildings Survey, Creator. Edwin C. Manning House, 200 East Capitol Street Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC. Documentation Compiled After, 1933. Pdf. Retrieved from the Library of Congress, <https://www.loc.gov/item/dc0381/&gt;.

&amp;amp;lt;style scoped&amp;amp;gt; #cite-this{ display: block; }&amp;amp;lt; /style&amp;amp;gt;

Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.
books.google.cahttps://books.google.ca/books/about/Legislative_Documents_Submitted_to_the_G.html?id=5FtLAQAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareLegislative Documents Submitted to the … General Assembly of the State of IowaLegislative Documents Submitted to the ... General Assembly of the State of Iowa
Page ci
Merimee, Prosper, French novelist and historian, A. L. S. Meyerbeer, illustrious
German composer, A. L. S. Napoleon Bonaparte, autograph and several portraits
. Sabatier, Rev. … Oil portrait of Edwin Manning, painted by Mulvaney. Presented
books.google.cahttps://books.google.ca/books/about/Legislative_Documents_Submitted_to_the_G.html?id=5FtLAQAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareLegislative Documents Submitted to the … General Assembly of the State of IowaLegislative Documents Submitted to the ... General Assembly of the State of Iowa
 
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

books.google.cahttps://books.google.ca/books/about/Legislative_Documents_Submitted_to_the_G.html?id=5FtLAQAAMAAJ&utm_source=gb-gplus-shareLegislative Documents Submitted to the … General Assembly of the State of IowaLegislative Documents Submitted to the ... General Assembly of the State of Iowa
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THIS IS the PDF

 http://books.googleusercontent.com/books/content?req=AKW5QafSWPoAx0BywVSNCaoU-hmKD5Ac9qjS-s0XAn8OWpnRD81sRpBXhJ_KE71y_O9V2FOMx5MVb6qvwXGc_blSn99XStg1_2VNcqCWOmSzGBhefrNCHDLnkRpsq7imj4HEcEAzR3DEddoioIBqfU25Ay-sK_-QtAVgPqqQ_2zyYn-lDyja1ZkHXFmBpsj5otk2YvyHTWufQtzicYptitle2kkCXhgt_tfbzGcFD3E0qmWgSAEx58UK6MQFMkI_Cgq1eaF2hOAwtuawV4Yi1kJsm5gWUon5C9b1S0q3FYLSd-En0Br0uJ8
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