ROUNDHOUSES, TURF-HOUSES, ROUNDHOUSE HISTORY and other COOL Home Ideas

Heard of a TURF HOUSE ? I haven’t, but it is similar to like cobbing except using a heck of a lot more earth. Interesting, though anyway.

Some HISTORY of our WORLD about what ROUNDHOUSES are etc.

ROUNDHOUSES, how to BUILD, History and CORDWOOD building

Building Celtic roundhouses

37,512 views

Published on Mar 20, 2012

How the Prehistoric Roundhouses at Llynnon Mill on Anglesey were built. For more information on our work please visit: http://www.ancient-arts.org and for details about visiting the site go to: http://www.visitanglesey.co.uk/en-GB/…

Ironage roundhouse

2,111 views

Published on Jan 22, 2016

Hadleigh Country Park in Essex, just to the west of Southend, has a living education programme based on the Saxons – Hadleigh is of Saxon origin meaning “clearing in the heath”. This work has been expanded to cover other periods, and at the same time provide a building to give school groups a sheltered working environment. Many options were considered, but the wish to build something dramatic and unique to the county led to the building of a replica Iron Age roundhouse. There are two Iron Age finds in Chapel Lane, and there is archaeological evidence of roundhouses at Shoeburyness and Orsett. Hadleigh’s roundhouse is based on a floor plan from an archaeological excavation at Little Waltham, near Chelmsford and was funded by a grant from Veolia ES Cleanaway Pitsea Marshes Trust.

Design Your Own Roundhouse

5,523 views

Published on Dec 18, 2016

Visit our site – http://modernhomedesignphotos.com SUBSCRIBE – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClOy… Our Second Channel SUBSCRIBE! https://www.youtube.com/c/SIMPLELIFEH… – – – HELP MY CHANNEL – – – Dogecoin Wallet: DJWY35EVSwKNtjyBnw9MYNVzqPi7dhns6a

Off grid roundhouse build part 1 The base

266,673 views

Published on May 25, 2015

starting the base of a huge bender in the woods. 5.5m wide by 6m long this is jus the base please follow me in this build, i hope you enjoy

Building and living in a roundhouse

7,022 views

Published on Jun 14, 2015

Colin has been living in rural Portugal for the last five years. Meet Colin and take a tour around his roundhouse and beautiful land. Hear about his building experience and visions for the future of this amazing low impact project.

tiny house / cordwood house / round house off grid

240,825 views

Published on Jun 9, 2011

http://www.permies.com Matt of Feral Farm shows a tiny house made of cordwood. This off grid house is also a round house. Matt talks about the issues of cordwood contrstruction, plus issues with round house construction. Matt explains that one of the perks of cordwood construction is that once the thermal mass is heated, it will hold the heat for a day. The biggest downside for cordwood is that as the wood dries, it shrinks. So gaps tend to form between the wood and the mortar – thus allowing wind to pass through the structure in hundreds of gaps. Or the wood cracks and provides a differend kind of gap. The solution is to use only thoroughly dried cordwood. This structure shows the benefit of using using thoroughly dried cordwood. Matt has done a great job of reusing materials that otherwise would have been thrown away. Complete with a micro kitchen and a wood stove. The base under the stove is an old chalkboard! Relevant threads at permies: http://www.permies.com/permaculture-f… http://www.permies.com/permaculture-f… music by Jimmy Pardo

Cordwood Building with Rob Roy

19,404 views

Published on Mar 22, 2017

Rob Roy’s new Edition of “Cordwood Building: The State of the Art” covers various wall-building methods and new mortar options; electrical wiring and code compliance; and augmented by fresh case studies from around the world; more than a dozen new chapters that cover the array of innovations in cordwood construction since the first release nearly 15 years ago. Cordwood Building remains the most comprehensive book available on cordwood masonry construction methods.

TURF/SOD HOUSES

Arc Architects Turf Building In Iceland 2013 EBUK presentation

41,106 views

Published on Feb 18, 2014

Arc Architects Turf Building In Iceland 2013 shown at EBUK conference 2014.

Turf house adventure

13,890 views

Published on Nov 3, 2015

A turfhouse was built on Lýtingsstaðir in summer 2015. Have a look to see how it was done!

Beautiful Tiny Turf House in Iceland – Full Tour & Interview

551,819 views

Published on Sep 28, 2016

In this video we tour a traditional Icelandic turf house at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum (http://islenskibaerinn.is/english/). Turf houses are the original green buildings because they were built using local and natural materials. In Southern Iceland they used turf from the local wetlands and lava stones to build thick walls that would insulate the houses against wind and cold weather. They imported small amounts of wood, or used driftwood. Most turf houses in Iceland were torn down after World War II when people were encouraged to modernize their homes which means there are almost no turf houses left. So we felt really lucky to visit the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum in Southern Iceland and meet with Hannes who runs the museum and whose grandparents and great grandparents used to live on, and run, the farm. Traditional turf houses, and especially turf houses on farms were built in clusters so you’ll see there’s many houses all linked together. Only one of them is actually the living space where you’ll find the beds. And then in the other houses you would find things like a horse stable or a food processing area, and they did this to take advantage of insulation from shared walls. Each house is joined together with hallways so that people could go from one area of the house to the other without having to go outside. Inside the main home you can see that all of the beds were in one room and this was where everyone did all of their work, where they slept, where they ate, where they gave birth. Everything in an Icelanders life happened in this main living space and it really was communal living. In addition to having really thick walls made with the lava stones and the turf, the houses are also dug and built into the back of a hill so that they’re protected from the cold Northerly winds. Hannes completely restored this old farmstead with his wife and mother, and while he continued to use the traditional methods using the turf and the lava stones for the walls, he did use corrugated iron for some of the outer walls and some of the newer roofs. It’s really incredible to see how cozy and liveable these small spaces are even though they’re built with such basic natural materials. If you’re interested in turf houses and green buildings (and if you’re planning a visit to Iceland!), we would definitely recommend visiting the Islenski Baerinn Turf House museum – it was probably our favourite part of our trip!!! They have a website here if you want to learn more: http://islenskibaerinn.is/english/ You can also follow them on Facebook, and Instagram: https://www.facebook.com/islenskibaerinn https://www.instagram.com/islenski_ba… We also want to say a big thank you to Eyvi (Eyjólfur Eyjólfsson) who we met at the Vöðlakot cafe at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House Museum who fed us delicious coffee & home made pancakes, and who took the time to play his beautiful langspil instrument that you see and hear at the beginning of the video. Thanks for watching! Mat & Danielle ————————————————————- STAY IN TOUCH! ———————————————————— Blog: http://www.exploringalternatives.ca Facebook: /exploringalternativesblog Instagram: @exploringalternatives Music & Song Credits: The music in this video was composed, performed, and recorded by Mat of Exploring Alternatives, except for the opening and closing song. The opening and closing song in this video is called “Langspils-kvæðalag” and is partly folksong but mostly composed by Örn Magnusson. It was performed by Eyjólfur Eyjólfsson who we met at the Vöðlakot cafe at the Islenski Baerinn Turf House Museum.

North Fjords and Glaumbær turf farm house

4,350 views

Published on Oct 22, 2016

Driving the north Fjords The turf farm house of Glaumbær http://www.glaumbaer.is/is/informatio… Music: YouTube Audio Library Hydara – Huma-Huma The Low Seas – The 126ers Moonshine Town – JR Tundra Humidity – Silent Partner Heartland- Silent Partner In the Garden – Silent Partner

21st Century Sod House

24,343 views

Published on Mar 24, 2013

Built by prairie pioneers and occupied continuously into the 21st Century this sod house and its long term resident, Edith Gardiner, have a lot to teach us about history and energy efficient living for today and the future.

Norwegian abandoned remote turf house becomes cabin getaway

104,429 views

Published on Oct 18, 2015

Students from the University of Trondheim have embraced the Norwegian cabin tradition and have built/rehabbed a network of 23 small cabins available to students interested in overnighting in isolated nature. The group- NTNUI (NTNU sportsklubb)- began in the 1940’s when a former Trondheim student was killed in WWII. His parents donated money and helped build the first cabin named Nicokoia after their son Nicolay. Today, the student group has built or renovated nearly two dozen “koiene” (huts). All are off-grid, many are only accessible by hiking, or cross-country skiing, several hours. They are all equipped with a working kitchen (a propane or kerosene stove) though the toilet is an outhouse and a local stream serves for drinking water and bathing. We visited the group’s newest acquisition, Vekvessætra, a nearly 200-year-old farmhouse which they leased from the local authorities and renovated in “the great Norwegian tradition of ‘dugnads’” (volunteer work). Eighteen students spent about two weeks rehabbing the old log cabin, replacing floors, windows, insulation and even installing a new sod roof. Sivert Eliassen and Siri Hårklau hosted us in what was once a summer farmhouse for local farmers (the area is still grazed by local sheep). Photo credit: Daniel Zwick, Egil A. Behrens and other group members. NTNUI Koiene: http://org.ntnu.no/koiene/engelsk.php Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/…

COB HOUSES and COB HOUSE BUILDING

HOW TO BUILD A MUD (COB) HOUSE CHEAP TO LAST 10,000 YEARS. ENGLAND.

146,145 views

Published on Dec 8, 2016

How to build a mud (cob) house cheap to last 10,000 years. England. Please watch this video to the end…It’s amazing how fast and simple it is….You can do it yourself! Listen to the comments from students learning how……So interesting! PLEASE SUBSCRIBE: globalvideopro1

Building with Cob – A Natural & Affordable Way to Build a House

79,435 views

Published on Oct 1, 2017

Bryce from Dreamweavers Collective explains the benefits and challenges of building with cob! Cob is a natural building material created from clay, sand, and straw that can be used to build load bearing walls, window and door frames, and much more. It’s an affordable and natural way to build using materials that are typically found locally. In fact, building with earth and natural fibres is a technique used in many places around the world. This style of construction can have different names, like earth building, adobe, mud bricks, etc. Unlike conventional buildings, cob is a simple way to build that can be an interesting and easy option to build a DIY green home using little, if any, toxic materials. Bryce teaches natural building and cob workshops in person and online. You can find out more about his courses on his website here: http://www.dreamweaverscollective.org/ He calls himself a 3rd generation cobber because he learned cob building techniques from Pat Hennebery at Cobworks: https://www.cobworks.com/ And Pat learned about cob from Ianto Evans, Linda Smiley, and the rest of the team at The Cob Cottage Company: http://www.cobcottage.com/ We hope you enjoyed learning about this interesting, natural, affordable, and alternative building technique 🙂 We think cob houses are incredible and beautiful structures! Photos taken by Bryce and Kelly from Dreamweavers Collective. Dome & arch photos taken at Arcosanti: https://arcosanti.org/ The Cob Cottage and other cob houses built by Cobworks: https://www.cobworks.com/ White cob cabin built by Terra Perma: https://terraperma.ca/en/ Thanks for watching! Mat & Danielle ————————————————————- SUPPORT OUR CHANNEL! ————————————————————- Thank you to all of our Patrons who support us so generously and a very special thank you to our backbone supporters: The Burgess Family and Jakob Dannesboe! If you like our videos, please consider supporting us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/exploringalte…

cob house design ideas

27,578 views

Published on Jul 6, 2017

ecological houses cob design ideas how to

BUILDING A COB HOUSE – INTRODUCTION TO COB

154,800 views

Published on May 6, 2016

Join the ‘Online Cob Workshop’ now: http://www.members.thiscobhouse.com/o… Get the BONUS materials by joining through this link: http://www.members.thiscobhouse.com/w… If you really think about it, most people can’t go to attend a cob workshop. There are various reasons for this, but usually its one of these: You just don’t have enough time available You can’t get vacation days off You can’t afford the high workshop fees and travel expenses I recognized this as a big problem facing the natural building movement. How are people ever going to be empowered with these skills and make a difference in the way we build if most people are barred from taking workshops for these sorts of reasons? For a solution to this problem, I wanted to completely eliminate the reasons people usually have for not being able to take a cob workshop. So, this is what I did in a nutshell… I took the traditional cob workshop and made it virtual. Yes, I made a comprehensive cob workshop that can be taken via the internet. This is what that means for you: You can learn from home at your own pace You don’t need to ever take vacation days off No travel required You only pay a fraction of the cost! As a teacher who’s goal is to deliver my students with a pathway to success, I have made it my task to over-deliver with this course. I guarantee that you will learn more in this online course than any other comprehensive workshop you could actually go and attend. Live workshops are great and very important, but with most of them they just don’t cover all of the important topics. Even though workshops can be for a week or more, most of that time is usually not spent efficiently learning all the aspects of building really needed. A standard week-long cob workshop is usually focused so much on mixing large quantities of cob and building cob walls that a whole list of other important topics is passed right over. Again, in my attempt to solve problems I’ve made the online cob workshop comprehensive in its scope. You don’t get the hands on aspect of a live workshop, but you get everything else and then some more! Here’s a snippet of what you’ll learn in the online Cob Workshop Classroom during the first 3 months. The lessons are comprised of videos and downloadable PDF readings. Month One Introduction to Earth Building Designing Your Cob House – Introduction Foundations – Basic Principles Site Preparation Rubble Trench Foundations 3-4-5 Method – How to Square a Site for Building Building a Stone Foundation – Part 1 Introduction Building a Stone Foundation – Part 2: Batter Boards Cob Ingredients – Soil, Sand, and Straw Testing and Selecting Soil Building Plans – Foundation One: Rubble Trench, Batter Boards, Stone Stem Wall Case Study – Joy’s Cob Brick Test Question and Answer – Month One Month Two Selecting a Building Site Passive Solar Design Building a Stone Foundation – Part 3: Collecting Stones Building a Stone Foundation – Part 4: Stone Masonry Tools Laying Out a Round Foundation Foundation Module Two: Round Foundation Thermal Mass and Insulation How to Make Cob – Tarp Method Analyzing Cob Test Bricks Basic Tools for Building a Cob House Month Three Building Cob Walls – Part 1: Properties & Dynamics Mixing Cob with a Tractor Building a Stone Foundation –Part 5: Stone Laying Building a Stone Foundation –Part 6: Mortar & Finishing Installing Utility Lines – Electricity & Water Hybrid Building Systems Passive Cooling Case Study: Arjuna’s House – Water Lines, Hybrid Design, Passive Solar Building Plans – Cob Wall Construction The lessons will take you through a linear progression of how to build your own cob house. If this sounds like it might solve some of your problems like I’ve mentioned, and if you are keen to join me and the other students currently enrolled in the program, please click here – http://www.members.thiscobhouse.com/o…

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